Yes David Platt, Heaven is for Real!

HeavenI realize that I'm a nobody. I'm just a small house church leader in SE Calgary who's voice is but a whisper in the midst of great speakers such as people like David Platt. But, I couldn't help but cringe as I listened to these words in his post "Why You Should Not Believe in 'Heaven is for Real'". Have we so lost our imaginations to the power of telling our story? My mother lived to be 39 years old. I was 15 when we both were in a car accident in 1994 where she passed away and I would spend the next 3 months fighting for my life in the General Hospital Intensive Care Unit. Over that year I witnessed several miraculous experiences but one will be with me for the rest of my life.

I laid there, starring at the wall at the foot of my ICU bed listening to the beeps and the whirrs of the machines around me. Then a small pin light appeared at the foot of my bed. It grew over the next few minutes until it was the size of maybe a yoga ball that radiated all around the room. I didn't really think or feel anything until a voice spoke to me from the light. My eyes filled up with tears and I could feel my self choking a bit as I heard my mother's voice. It was warm and filled with love and only spoke a few words. She said, "You and your father will be ok."

It perplexed me in many ways that I won't share here but I felt a great sense of hope and peace knowing that my mother was with Jesus. Perhaps that is what many of these experiences and stories of the miraculous are meant to mean; a struggle or paradox between our rationality and reason with the ever present tense of the Kingdom of hope and peace being near! Should we ever hide these stories? Should we be quiet out of the fear that others simply will not understand?

David Platt is right that several of the biblical authors also experienced prophetic visions of heaven with Isaiah seeing the Lord on a throne with his robe filling the Jerusalem temple and angels all around him (Isa. 6); Ezekiel envisioning fire lashing out with gleaming metal (Eze. 1); not of Paul's vision, but the testimony/story of another man's vision of the "third heaven" - "whether in the body or out of the body I do not know, God knows." (2 Cor. 12:2) (Interesting to note here that Paul himself accepted the story of a fellow believer while leaving the wonders of it up to God); and of course John's vision of doorways to heaven, thrones, and voices like trumpets (Rev. 4)! Yet each grappled with what words to use to describe what they saw and each were ostracized, judged, and told to be quiet by the priests and community around them much like those who share such stories today.

There were also many who experienced resurrection and coming back from the dead such as the young girl who Jesus laid his hand upon as she "awoke" (Matt. 9:18-26); a widow's son (Luke 7:11-17); and most famously, the story of Lazarus (John 11:1-44). Again, you are correct David Platt that the scriptures do not speak of any stories or experiences that these people shared and yet, that does not mean they did not share any. What stories do you suppose Mary and Martha shared with the villagers and those they saw in their travels? What experiences could Lazarus have spoke of while being dead in the tomb? Who are we to say, or were you there?!

I don't profess not to struggle with some of the details in people's visions like Colton Burpo's story. But I don't doubt at all that they experienced something significant that greatly affected the trajectory of their lives! So in what ways can these visions and dreams speak to us today?

In the first sense, these events happened to these people and their experiences have deep and meaningful significance to them. They have a right to speak of them and share how God may have spoke into their lives! We may not understand or even agree with everything they share but, we cannot deny that they experienced something in their life and it is shaping who they are.

Secondly, by listening to their stories we can find symbols of hope! By witnessing their testimony and the radical transformation that it has on their lives, we find an epiphany of God's presence, love, and recognition to our existence. Though we know only in part, God's glory is still in these stories. They are visions of God's Kingdom come near in both the personal experience of the individuals and the communal promise of hope to the greatest story ever told!

Perhaps the greatest way we can treat these stories is by taking the advice of James, being quick to listen and slow to speak so that whatever righteousness God might work (James 1:19-20), might be done so through His works and not our own. Or should we become like the Pharisees commanding the crowds to silent at Jesus' presence?! I think not less the stones begin to cry out! (Luke 19:40) If we all were willing to cry out "The Kingdom of God is near!" without fear of the judgements of others, perhaps then yes David Platt, we will recognize heaven is.. for real!

Lastly David Platt, regarding Kevin Malarkey... Who are we to speak against a person's birth right and family name let alone that of a boy?! Does not the bible speak of the significance to a person's family name? These are names of importance, history, meaning, and they deserve respect and honour in any room! To demean and mock them with a tact of bullying is in no way an act of Christ discipleship!