Gleaning Through Three Stages of the Enlightenment While Contemplating the Great "I Am"

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"Common sense is the best distributed commodity in the world, for every man is convinced that he is well supplied with it. Cogito, ergo sum." (I think, therefore I am.) Or at least Rene Descartes thought so as reflected on the age of Enlightenment. With systematic sciences on the rise, the world was changing and humanity's perspectives on the church, human nature, and God were being revolutionarily transformed by three natural perspectives. The first of which was the voice of reason or what Platchard called natural religion. This ideological understanding dichotomized "between 'natural religion', the basic truths about the existence of God and human morality known to good people in all societies, and 'revealed religion', the particular historical claims and doctrines of Christianity and other religions." (Pg. #240) With science putting systematic categorical placements on everything in nature, the Enlightenment would redefine the gospel outside of the nature of purpose and, in Bosch's language, turn God into the object for the equal consumption of all as apposed to the subject of relation to the elected few. He writes, "Reason represented a heritage that belonged not only to 'believers', but to all human beings in equal measure." (Pg. #270)

To the believer who dedicated their life to God, reason alone was not articulated enough to express the uniqueness of their relationship to the one true God. The gospel must be "born again" to transcend the simplistic rationalizations of common man. The mystical wondering of an outside Kingdom breaking into the world with the promise of liberation must still evoke the emotions of the heart and overcome the ideological expectations of cause and effect with a spirit of grace. Alas, to think religiously and to live by faith became institutionalized even more through the development of contextualized segmented religious cultures that rather retreated from the world as apposed to transforming the world.

With one voice rationalizing religion as an "opiate to the masses" and the other retreating into institutionalized segregated commonwealths, a third voice was piecing the gospel pursuit in the sojourning life long pilgrimage for the revelation of objective truth. As Gotthold Lessing expressed, "The worth of a man does not consist in the truth he possesses, or thinks he possesses, but in the pains he has taken to attain that truth... If God held all truth in his right hand and in his left the everlasting striving after truth... and said to me, 'Choose', with humility I would pick on the left hand and say, 'Father grant me that. Absolute truth is for thee alone." (Pg. #250) Alas, as Bosch points out, all to often enabled "humans to remake the world [and God] in their own image and according to their own design." (Pg. #273)

Returning to Descartes and "Cogito, ergo sum". As the Enlightenment boxed the gospel into a mental rhythm of simple knowledge and academic exercise, we must peer deeper into the depths of our calling in discipleship. It is not to think that reflects who I am but, it is for the purpose to enflesh the great "I am" that I exist! (John 14:6)