A Missional Hermeneutic Pt. #4 ~ Conclusion ~ Discovering a Communal Hermeneutic

Hearing the Spirit
Hearing the Spirit

It is by engaging in the mission of the church that we discover a hermeneutical understanding of Ecclesiology and the way we practice community. God’s word was not meant to be confined to the single interpretation of just one person but rather meant to speak through the communal practices of a community seeking understanding and living in the diversity of expression. Bob Goudzwaard in his book Hope in Troubled Times describes the diversity of leadership through the image of a satellite. He writes,

Globalization is like a satellite launched into space by certain booster rockets, such as the emancipation of world trade, the information technology revolution, and the existence of a coherent international monetary system. Once it has reached its appropriate height, however, the satellite turns and circles the world autonomously under its own power or dynamic. It follows only its own orbit. And from that circuit, it exerts its increasingly powerful influence on the world.[1]

God’s Word catalyzes itself through all space and time, the meaning of which is found hermeneutically through the practice of communal sharing and interpretation. As Mark Love sees this diversity,

Biblical diversity is in part the product of faithful communities reflecting on the presence of God in a variety of circumstances. In turn, this means that these circumstances are not just cultural trappings to be shed for the sake of timeless truths. Rather, these circumstances are necessary aspects of the spectrum that comprises the biblical testimonies about God.[2]

The purpose to any hermeneutic is the seeking out and understanding of God’s Word as we live within the guides of the ancient text of scripture found in the Bible. As Paul pointed out to the people of Athens so many years ago, humanity’s greatest desire is in seeking, “God, [so that they might] perhaps feel their way toward him and find him.[3]

In another phrase, Mark Love puts it as; “The point of interpretation is not simply to uncover the “message” of a text, but to discern God’s identity and the particular shape of the call of God on our life together.[4]

God deeply desires to be a part of our life and it is through his word that each of us can find ourselves being drawn into the proximity of His movement in and through us. Through the practice of a missional hermeneutic we can find not just ink written on pages but rather a living, breathing, word of life that will forever change us and bring us new meaning.

[1] Bob Goudzwaard, Mark Vennen, and David Heemst, Hope in Troubled Times: A New Vision for Confronting Global Crises (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2007), 140.

[2] Mark Love, "Missional Interpretation: The Encounter of a Holy God through a Living Text," (Paper presented at Rochester College, Rochester, MI., 5.

[3]The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. 2001 (Ac 17:27). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[4] Mark Love, "Missional Interpretation: The Encounter of a Holy God through a Living Text," (Paper presented at Rochester College, Rochester, MI., 6.