Finding Blood, Fire and Smoky Mist In Today's Wait For The Big Kahuna

smoky-mistBlood, fire and smoky mist (Joel 2:30), words which as Mark shares are rich in the metaphorical presence of spirituality and biblically spoken to the eminence of God in creation. I can't dismiss the physicality of these elements in scripture. Was Joel speaking figuratively or literally? Does the timing have to be the same for them all? Are they telling of some real narrative recorded later in God's story such as the blood and water pouring out from Christ's chest? I don't really know and it could also boil down to the semantics of questioning the definition of reality. Still, I think there is a validity both metaphorically and physically to Joel's words in the eschatological sense; or end to one world and the beginning of the other. This morning I spoke in my old college around the Wisdom of God revealed through the story of Job while dwelling in Job 38-42. Metaphorically these passages speak eschatologically into the new life Job would be living and I tied it to the point that 'It's not about who started it, it's about who finishes it'. It is Job's character of submitting everything he has, both the good and the bad (Job 2:10), that allows God to bring him into the newness of a man who, "girds up his loins before" (38:3) all of creation and declares God's, "things to wonderful" (42:3), to mystifying, to amazing to be more then just about "me"!

Likewise, Jesus on the cross submits himself to God in the work of defeating sin while crying, "It is finished!" (John 19:30) The world of brokenness, separation from God, the blindness of the Kingdom being present is removed and a new world is set in its place where we might live in the freedom of God's promises multiplied through the Spirit's gifting's and catalyzing us into a the missio Dei while being in "awe" at the "wonders and signs" (Acts 2:43) manifesting themselves amidst us.

The church then, "moves in the world with humility, knowing that it is always being called to its own conversion as it attempts to embody the coming realities of the Kingdom." (Mark, Pg. #15) A Kingdom where creation has "all things in common" (Acts 2:44), justice and righteousness is sought for all (2:45), and hospitality is given to everyone without reserve or indifference  (2:46).

I think a good question might be in that as we submit to God through the work of the apostles, how might we define "work"? While the Christian community embodies the metaphorical "Blood, fire and smoky mist" as signs to the presence of Christ's Spirit through the discipling identity of communal prayer, breaking of bread, and dwelling in God's Word; these terms must apostolically (Eph. 4) become engrained into all of life's expressions, both personally and communally, so as not to become a, "self-aggrandizement of the church or individuals", but shared with all as a, "participation in God’s coming kingdom." (Mark Pg. #15) With all of creations participation in the coming Kingdom, success is not measured by fulness of the institution or the definition of doctrine, rather it is found in the willingness for embodying a Spirit of, "inclusion, participation, generosity, and attentiveness to the other." (Mark Pg. #24)

It was in the movie 'The Big Kahuna' that the character Larry Mann (played by Kevin Spacey) mistakenly asked his cohorts, "Did you mention what line of industrial lubricants Jesus would have endorsed?" It was a question in search for his own self-aggrandizement or assurance of business success which had little to do with being in service for others. The search, or wait, for the entrance of "The Big Kahuna" had little to do with the "greatness" of Larry Mann or any of the other characters, and was more about their willingness to submit to their own insignificance for the sake of the greatness of others. Or, in the words of Phil Cooper (played by Danny Devito)...

"I'm saying you've already done plenty of things to regret, you just don't know what they are. It's when you discover them, when you see the folly in something you've done, and you wish that you had it do over, but you know you can't, because it's too late. So you pick that thing up, and carry it with you to remind you that life goes on, the world will spin without you, you really don't matter in the end. Then you will gain character, because honesty will reach out from inside and tattoo itself across your face."

I can't help but reflect back on a thought I had a few weeks ago. Posting it on Facebook I wrote: "The greatest trick the devil ever played was convincing the world he didn't exist. The greatest trick that God ever played was convincing the devil that he was winning. Which trick are you playing?"

With the embrace of new life that we find in Christ, I think we often blind ourselves to the on going death that is taking place within ourselves simultaneously. Perhaps we think it as morbid or negative to do so but, we cannot separate the joys and freedoms of a resurrected eternal life from the ongoing cruciform life we live in today as temporal created beings. While the physical cross was embraced by Jesus on the hill of Golgotha in his 33rd year, he metaphorically clung to the cross through his entire life.

Living in this way, I think, is really a continuance of practicing a life of "awe and wonder" in the Spirit's work. Assumedly, we have confused this practice to the witness to the "good" in life while leaving the "bad" to cast off, marginalize, or exclude from the soul's journey. Revolutionarily, Jesus diverges this understanding by calling us not to act in judgement between the "good" and the "bad", clean and unclean, holy and unholy, but allow ourselves to see all things as new. In some sense, we are to be in awe and wonder of sin and brokenness too, not judging it and excluding it from ourselves or the other, but rather submitting it as part of the redemptive process we go through both as personal and communal beings before God in community.

Returning to the question of, "Which trick are you playing?" If we are in the effort of trying to prove the devil's existence, attempting to judge and articulate every nature of sin in creation by saving that which we think is good and excluding that which we deem as being bad, we will fail and ultimately find little meaning in life. But if we embrace the metaphorical cross of Jesus, loose ourselves to the wonder and awe of all things both good and bad, we will find a life of ultimate significance and deepest meaning. It is a life that gives into the Spirit of all things being, "not my will Father, but yours!"