Worship

The Gravity Of Wonder

You can’t deny gravity. Well, it’s extremely hard to anyways, and even if you are able to escape its grip, it isn’t at all sustainable for any real length of time and it's not long before you come crashing back to the reality that gravity is tethered to you for life.

I remember when my wife & I went to the theatre to see the movie 'Gravity' for the first time. Sitting practically right in front of the screen, with our 3D glasses on, the grand infinity of space opened up to us during the beginning frames. I always love the beauty in these scenes as they bring a sense of...

A Experimental Narrative to Ephesians 4

Well, here goes... There lives a magnificent artist and like all masters, his palate is an extension of himself. Spreading the colors of life across his palate he took up the one singular narrative of his masterpiece on one single grand canvas. Blank as it was, with each brush stroke life was brought to the canvas and the artists expressions lite up the imaginations of all who saw it.

Starting with an apostolic background the essences of the colors mixed creating variant shades that would later interconnect the dynamic articulation and contexts he would soon add to tell his story. 

With a backdrop set, the artist began adding a prophetic environment of setting and a revealing of place and time. This brought out the hidden and deeper meanings of...

Of Pride & Self Worship: A Theological Exegesis of Amos 6:1-8

Introduction This exegesis is meant to explore the oracle of Amos 6:1-8 while also having an attentive mind to the ways in which God may be speaking to us today. It is Amos who states, “Do two walk together unless they have agreed to do so?”[1] A rhetorical question that the prophet asks early in his letter so that those who would hear his words would recognize the deep calling he felt in proclaiming God’s judgments to the nation. While Amos walked with the Lord in this calling, let us also walk together as we listen to God’s words of judgment through his prophet and seek a deeper discernment to what God may reveal to us today.

Amos the Man and the Backdrop of Israel

The prophet Amos was an average Judean countryside herdsman and caretaker of fig trees near a small town called Takoa, which was about 10km south of the city of...

Finding Blood, Fire and Smoky Mist In Today's Wait For The Big Kahuna

smoky-mistBlood, fire and smoky mist (Joel 2:30), words which as Mark shares are rich in the metaphorical presence of spirituality and biblically spoken to the eminence of God in creation. I can't dismiss the physicality of these elements in scripture. Was Joel speaking figuratively or literally? Does the timing have to be the same for them all? Are they telling of some real narrative recorded later in God's story such as the blood and water pouring out from Christ's chest? I don't really know and it could also boil down to the semantics of questioning the definition of reality. Still, I think there is a validity both metaphorically and physically to Joel's words in the eschatological sense; or end to one world and the beginning of the other. This morning I spoke in my old college around the Wisdom of God revealed through the story of Job while dwelling in Job 38-42. Metaphorically these passages speak eschatologically into the new life Job would be living and I tied it to the point that 'It's not about who started it, it's about who finishes it'. It is Job's character of submitting everything he has, both the good and the bad (Job 2:10), that allows God to bring him into the newness of a man who, "girds up his loins before" (38:3) all of creation and declares God's, "things to wonderful" (42:3), to mystifying, to amazing to be more then just about "me"!

Likewise, Jesus on the cross submits himself to God in the work of defeating sin while crying, "It is finished!" (John 19:30) The world of brokenness, separation from God, the blindness of the Kingdom being present is removed and a new world is set in its place where we might live in the freedom of God's promises multiplied through the Spirit's gifting's and catalyzing us into a the missio Dei while being in "awe" at the "wonders and signs" (Acts 2:43) manifesting themselves amidst us.

The church then, "moves in the world with humility, knowing that it is always being called to its own conversion as it attempts to embody the coming realities of the Kingdom." (Mark, Pg. #15) A Kingdom where creation has "all things in common" (Acts 2:44), justice and righteousness is sought for all (2:45), and hospitality is given to everyone without reserve or indifference  (2:46).

I think a good question might be in that as we submit to God through the work of the apostles, how might we define "work"? While the Christian community embodies the metaphorical "Blood, fire and smoky mist" as signs to the presence of Christ's Spirit through the discipling identity of communal prayer, breaking of bread, and dwelling in God's Word; these terms must apostolically (Eph. 4) become engrained into all of life's expressions, both personally and communally, so as not to become a, "self-aggrandizement of the church or individuals", but shared with all as a, "participation in God’s coming kingdom." (Mark Pg. #15) With all of creations participation in the coming Kingdom, success is not measured by fulness of the institution or the definition of doctrine, rather it is found in the willingness for embodying a Spirit of, "inclusion, participation, generosity, and attentiveness to the other." (Mark Pg. #24)

It was in the movie 'The Big Kahuna' that the character Larry Mann (played by Kevin Spacey) mistakenly asked his cohorts, "Did you mention what line of industrial lubricants Jesus would have endorsed?" It was a question in search for his own self-aggrandizement or assurance of business success which had little to do with being in service for others. The search, or wait, for the entrance of "The Big Kahuna" had little to do with the "greatness" of Larry Mann or any of the other characters, and was more about their willingness to submit to their own insignificance for the sake of the greatness of others. Or, in the words of Phil Cooper (played by Danny Devito)...

"I'm saying you've already done plenty of things to regret, you just don't know what they are. It's when you discover them, when you see the folly in something you've done, and you wish that you had it do over, but you know you can't, because it's too late. So you pick that thing up, and carry it with you to remind you that life goes on, the world will spin without you, you really don't matter in the end. Then you will gain character, because honesty will reach out from inside and tattoo itself across your face."

I can't help but reflect back on a thought I had a few weeks ago. Posting it on Facebook I wrote: "The greatest trick the devil ever played was convincing the world he didn't exist. The greatest trick that God ever played was convincing the devil that he was winning. Which trick are you playing?"

With the embrace of new life that we find in Christ, I think we often blind ourselves to the on going death that is taking place within ourselves simultaneously. Perhaps we think it as morbid or negative to do so but, we cannot separate the joys and freedoms of a resurrected eternal life from the ongoing cruciform life we live in today as temporal created beings. While the physical cross was embraced by Jesus on the hill of Golgotha in his 33rd year, he metaphorically clung to the cross through his entire life.

Living in this way, I think, is really a continuance of practicing a life of "awe and wonder" in the Spirit's work. Assumedly, we have confused this practice to the witness to the "good" in life while leaving the "bad" to cast off, marginalize, or exclude from the soul's journey. Revolutionarily, Jesus diverges this understanding by calling us not to act in judgement between the "good" and the "bad", clean and unclean, holy and unholy, but allow ourselves to see all things as new. In some sense, we are to be in awe and wonder of sin and brokenness too, not judging it and excluding it from ourselves or the other, but rather submitting it as part of the redemptive process we go through both as personal and communal beings before God in community.

Returning to the question of, "Which trick are you playing?" If we are in the effort of trying to prove the devil's existence, attempting to judge and articulate every nature of sin in creation by saving that which we think is good and excluding that which we deem as being bad, we will fail and ultimately find little meaning in life. But if we embrace the metaphorical cross of Jesus, loose ourselves to the wonder and awe of all things both good and bad, we will find a life of ultimate significance and deepest meaning. It is a life that gives into the Spirit of all things being, "not my will Father, but yours!"

"What Is A House Church?" ~ Vision Proper For The Tribe of Expressions

"What is a House Church?" This is probably the most common question I get asked when people hear that I am a House Church leader in The Edge. I think one of the common mistakes we make in answering comes when we see House Churches as a model rather then an organic community of people. We say, "We are trying to..."

  • "... be like the 1st century house churches."
  • "... be less organizational."
  • "... just do life with friends and family."
  • "... do church smaller within our homes and living rooms."
  • "... be a simple small group."

When we really look at what being a house church is, our intentions are not to follow a model or even past example, it is really to be a closely knit spiritual family who are...

Islam: A Christian Encounter

Out of the three planned visitations, this was perhaps the one I most looked forward too. I have developed a number of relationships in my community with Muslims and while through conversations I have learned much, this was an opportunity to speak with an Imam and experience a place of worship in their community. Sadly, out of the three, this became rather one of the most disappointing experiences.

I spoke several weeks ago with my barber and friend Mo, who is a Muslim, about visiting a mosque and he was able to get me a phone number to the Islamic school here in Calgary where they have prayer services every Friday between 1 pm and 2 pm. Phoning ahead, I contacted them this past week and arranged to attend...

A Deep Gaze Into Missional Theology and The Eschatological Gleanings From Them ~ Pt. #5 ~ Fun Houses and the True Identity of the Ekklesia

As a boy I used to love going to the local fair and exploring the fun houses and the glass maze. I would sometimes spend hours feeling my way through the glass and mirrors till I reached the top of the house and the maze broke way to a large open room filled with funny mirrors. They were curved and warped so that when I stood in front of them they would distort my image and I’d look really short and fat or tall and super skinny. I’d laugh with my friends, point at their funny images, and strike poses for my own amusement. Looking back, there was a certain degree of reality within those moments in the fun houses. Paul shares with the church in Corinth that, “When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways. 12 For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face.”[1] He was articulating that as we grow in the maturity of Christ, we do not fully comprehend all that the Kingdom of God wishes us to see...

A Deep Gaze Into Missional Theology and The Eschatological Gleanings From Them ~ Pt. #4 ~ The Great Collide: The Intertwining Kingdom of God with the World

The taking up of the call into discipleship and an ecclesiology of death through the embrace of the imago Christi is not without its benefits either. In a great book by Sylvia Keesmaat and Brian Walsh called ‘Colosians Remixed’, they share that, “In Christ we have come to say to the darkness, ‘We beg to differ.’ We have seceded from the empire of darkness and been granted citizenship in the Kingdom of the beloved Son.”[1] Finding ourselves in citizenship as part of God’s Kingdom brings a great freedom to our interactions within the world as N.T. Wright observes that, “The kingdom of God and the kingdoms of the world come together to produce a vision of history moving forward toward its goal, a goal that will emerge from within...

A Deep Gaze Into Missional Theology and The Eschatological Gleanings From Them ~ Pt. #3 ~ Missiology in Apostolic Actions of Dominion

Within the relational Trinitarian order, witnessing the apostolic sending of each agent over one another cannot be dismissed as evident. Without a specific order scripture articulates the diverse places each agent interacts and is sent into creation; from the Spirit hovering over the waters of creation,[1] to the Father dwelling within a burning bush,[2] to the Son being sent to fulfill the law;[3] God acts apostolically within his identity and creation to fulfill his mission. In the same sense, we cannot separate the missio Dei from the creational order of the imago Dei as God created us in his image for the purposes of dominion.[4] By the most natural sense our, “Doxological response means participation in and transformation...

Living for Potential (Audio) - My Message at CCCF

potentiality.jpg

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to speak at Canyon Creek Christian Fellowship on Sunday January 2nd, 2011 about Living for Potential while focusing on Matthew 5:48. Although feeling a little rusty, here is what I shared...

[audio=http://justwondering.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/living-for-potential.mp3]

[slideshare id=6510883&doc=livingforpotential-110110164658-phpapp01]