Christianity

Finding Blood, Fire and Smoky Mist In Today's Wait For The Big Kahuna

smoky-mistBlood, fire and smoky mist (Joel 2:30), words which as Mark shares are rich in the metaphorical presence of spirituality and biblically spoken to the eminence of God in creation. I can't dismiss the physicality of these elements in scripture. Was Joel speaking figuratively or literally? Does the timing have to be the same for them all? Are they telling of some real narrative recorded later in God's story such as the blood and water pouring out from Christ's chest? I don't really know and it could also boil down to the semantics of questioning the definition of reality. Still, I think there is a validity both metaphorically and physically to Joel's words in the eschatological sense; or end to one world and the beginning of the other. This morning I spoke in my old college around the Wisdom of God revealed through the story of Job while dwelling in Job 38-42. Metaphorically these passages speak eschatologically into the new life Job would be living and I tied it to the point that 'It's not about who started it, it's about who finishes it'. It is Job's character of submitting everything he has, both the good and the bad (Job 2:10), that allows God to bring him into the newness of a man who, "girds up his loins before" (38:3) all of creation and declares God's, "things to wonderful" (42:3), to mystifying, to amazing to be more then just about "me"!

Likewise, Jesus on the cross submits himself to God in the work of defeating sin while crying, "It is finished!" (John 19:30) The world of brokenness, separation from God, the blindness of the Kingdom being present is removed and a new world is set in its place where we might live in the freedom of God's promises multiplied through the Spirit's gifting's and catalyzing us into a the missio Dei while being in "awe" at the "wonders and signs" (Acts 2:43) manifesting themselves amidst us.

The church then, "moves in the world with humility, knowing that it is always being called to its own conversion as it attempts to embody the coming realities of the Kingdom." (Mark, Pg. #15) A Kingdom where creation has "all things in common" (Acts 2:44), justice and righteousness is sought for all (2:45), and hospitality is given to everyone without reserve or indifference  (2:46).

I think a good question might be in that as we submit to God through the work of the apostles, how might we define "work"? While the Christian community embodies the metaphorical "Blood, fire and smoky mist" as signs to the presence of Christ's Spirit through the discipling identity of communal prayer, breaking of bread, and dwelling in God's Word; these terms must apostolically (Eph. 4) become engrained into all of life's expressions, both personally and communally, so as not to become a, "self-aggrandizement of the church or individuals", but shared with all as a, "participation in God’s coming kingdom." (Mark Pg. #15) With all of creations participation in the coming Kingdom, success is not measured by fulness of the institution or the definition of doctrine, rather it is found in the willingness for embodying a Spirit of, "inclusion, participation, generosity, and attentiveness to the other." (Mark Pg. #24)

It was in the movie 'The Big Kahuna' that the character Larry Mann (played by Kevin Spacey) mistakenly asked his cohorts, "Did you mention what line of industrial lubricants Jesus would have endorsed?" It was a question in search for his own self-aggrandizement or assurance of business success which had little to do with being in service for others. The search, or wait, for the entrance of "The Big Kahuna" had little to do with the "greatness" of Larry Mann or any of the other characters, and was more about their willingness to submit to their own insignificance for the sake of the greatness of others. Or, in the words of Phil Cooper (played by Danny Devito)...

"I'm saying you've already done plenty of things to regret, you just don't know what they are. It's when you discover them, when you see the folly in something you've done, and you wish that you had it do over, but you know you can't, because it's too late. So you pick that thing up, and carry it with you to remind you that life goes on, the world will spin without you, you really don't matter in the end. Then you will gain character, because honesty will reach out from inside and tattoo itself across your face."

I can't help but reflect back on a thought I had a few weeks ago. Posting it on Facebook I wrote: "The greatest trick the devil ever played was convincing the world he didn't exist. The greatest trick that God ever played was convincing the devil that he was winning. Which trick are you playing?"

With the embrace of new life that we find in Christ, I think we often blind ourselves to the on going death that is taking place within ourselves simultaneously. Perhaps we think it as morbid or negative to do so but, we cannot separate the joys and freedoms of a resurrected eternal life from the ongoing cruciform life we live in today as temporal created beings. While the physical cross was embraced by Jesus on the hill of Golgotha in his 33rd year, he metaphorically clung to the cross through his entire life.

Living in this way, I think, is really a continuance of practicing a life of "awe and wonder" in the Spirit's work. Assumedly, we have confused this practice to the witness to the "good" in life while leaving the "bad" to cast off, marginalize, or exclude from the soul's journey. Revolutionarily, Jesus diverges this understanding by calling us not to act in judgement between the "good" and the "bad", clean and unclean, holy and unholy, but allow ourselves to see all things as new. In some sense, we are to be in awe and wonder of sin and brokenness too, not judging it and excluding it from ourselves or the other, but rather submitting it as part of the redemptive process we go through both as personal and communal beings before God in community.

Returning to the question of, "Which trick are you playing?" If we are in the effort of trying to prove the devil's existence, attempting to judge and articulate every nature of sin in creation by saving that which we think is good and excluding that which we deem as being bad, we will fail and ultimately find little meaning in life. But if we embrace the metaphorical cross of Jesus, loose ourselves to the wonder and awe of all things both good and bad, we will find a life of ultimate significance and deepest meaning. It is a life that gives into the Spirit of all things being, "not my will Father, but yours!"

"What Is A House Church?" ~ Vision Proper For The Tribe of Expressions

"What is a House Church?" This is probably the most common question I get asked when people hear that I am a House Church leader in The Edge. I think one of the common mistakes we make in answering comes when we see House Churches as a model rather then an organic community of people. We say, "We are trying to..."

  • "... be like the 1st century house churches."
  • "... be less organizational."
  • "... just do life with friends and family."
  • "... do church smaller within our homes and living rooms."
  • "... be a simple small group."

When we really look at what being a house church is, our intentions are not to follow a model or even past example, it is really to be a closely knit spiritual family who are...

Islam: A Christian Encounter

Out of the three planned visitations, this was perhaps the one I most looked forward too. I have developed a number of relationships in my community with Muslims and while through conversations I have learned much, this was an opportunity to speak with an Imam and experience a place of worship in their community. Sadly, out of the three, this became rather one of the most disappointing experiences.

I spoke several weeks ago with my barber and friend Mo, who is a Muslim, about visiting a mosque and he was able to get me a phone number to the Islamic school here in Calgary where they have prayer services every Friday between 1 pm and 2 pm. Phoning ahead, I contacted them this past week and arranged to attend...

Jodo Shinshu Buddhism: A Christian Encounter

Driving over to the Calgary Jodo Shinshu Buddhist Temple[1] I wasn’t quite sure what I would encounter. I knew that Buddhism has many different expressions and I wasn’t sure whether this community would be a full cultural emersion into eastern practices or if it would be a blend of eastern and western philosophies.

Arriving, I quickly noticed that it had recently been renovated and was very architecturally appealing. Later I would get to speak with one of the elder members of the temple who explained that the house was actually 100 years old and had only recently been renovated into the temple that it now is. There was a ramp that allowed access as I wheeled...

Judaism: A Christian Encounter

I can’t honestly say what I expected to find when I drove to the Temple B’nai Tivah building. From past books that I have read, it seemed I understood Jewish synagogues to be rather stark and bare when it came to artistic expression, as it was an effort of their community to not have any “graven image” be upon their walls. That said, what I found in the temple was a rich environment of artistic work and cultural expression!

Moving my way through the hallways I found beautiful paintings and artwork on the walls depicting different storylines from the Torah. One particular painting grabbed my attention with what looked like a tree that was on fire and a man standing next to it. My mind instantly gravitated to the story of Moses and the burning bush...

A Missional Hermeneutic Pt. #4 ~ Conclusion ~ Discovering a Communal Hermeneutic

It is by engaging in the mission of the church that we discover a hermeneutical understanding of Ecclesiology and the way we practice community. God’s word was not meant to be confined to the single interpretation of just one person but rather meant to speak through the communal practices of a community seeking understanding and living in the diversity of expression. Bob Goudzwaard in his book Hope in Troubled Times describes the diversity of leadership through the image of a satellite. He writes,

Globalization is like a satellite launched into space by certain booster rockets, such as the emancipation of world trade, the information technology revolution, and the existence of a coherent international monetary system. Once it has reached...

A Missional Hermeneutic Pt. #3 ~ Three Worlds Converging: Finding a Hermeneutical Practice in Context, Cultures, and the Gospel

Over the course of reading and taking into the accounts of the strengths in each of the past approaches, I recognized a convergence of viewing scripture within the worlds of Context, Culture, and the Gospel as their movements interacted with one another. Finding a hermeneutical understanding to the scriptures could not be separated from any of these elements and through them, God would speak timelessly to all people. Context

As Miroslav Volf recognizes, “In addition to having been written in the past, the Bible, to a great extent, tells stories about concrete events from the past.[1] We cannot dismiss the importance of recognizing the historical placement of these great...

A Missional Hermeneutic Pt. #2 ~ Foundations of Missional Artistry: Four Approaches to a Hermeneutical Practice

In his ‘Proposal for a Missional Hermeneutic’ George Hunsberger present four streams of thought in a missional approach to hermeneutics. Each one holds to a vital emphases or point to finding meaning in the scriptures but may fall short in other areas of interpretation. The first approach to defining a hermeneutic focuses on the writing of scripture as a whole collected work, while finding the central understanding on the story or mission of God throughout the completed text. Speaking from Christopher Wright’s approach, Hunsberger states that, “taken as a canonical whole, the Bible, he says, tells the story of God’s mission in and for the whole world, and with it the story of the people of God whom God has called and sent to be implicated in that mission.[1]

In this view, the biblical text as a whole is viewed as a narrative, which does not seem to leave much room for the expression of cultural metaphorical expression. Historically we know also that many of the first century Christians and their community’s did not...

A Missional Hermeneutic Pt. #1 – Hearing and Understanding the Voice of God

In the very deepest parts of our human nature, it is our desire to know, hear, and understand the voice of our creator. After all, we were created in his image and in that reflection he spoke to us and blessed us saying, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth.[1] But fruitfulness and dominion need meaning and understanding and this is why hermeneutics are so important as without them, we are left in a pit of noise, deafened by our own ignorance and arrogant pride. For this reason I am reflecting on the importance of understanding a missional hermeneutic to the Christian Holy scriptures, the different approaches taken, and how I might see my hermeneutic taking shape in understanding the Word of God.

As George Hunsberger describes, a hermeneutical understanding has for a long time been discussed and yet no formal practice or consensus has been agreed...

A Deep Gaze Into Missional Theology and The Eschatological Gleanings From Them ~ Conclusion

As Christ followers find themselves entwined into the triunity of a relational understanding to the Trinity, the imago Dei and the imago Christi are catalyzed into a divine collision between the Kingdom of God and the world. While being elected into the apostolic community of “sent ones”, they are released into a revolutional eternal life of the missio Dei. We embrace this new identity not by our own deserving, nor by any of our own works, but as N. T. Wright states, “We are committed to describing the world not just as it should be, not just as it is, but as—by God’s grace alone![1]

It is our confession that, “There is one body and one Spirit—just as you were called to the one hope that belongs to your call— one Lord, one faith...